Virtual Simulations in Online Nursing Education: Align With Quality Matters

Kathleen Huun has authored an excellent article about virtual simulation in online nursing programs. Over the last 2.5 years, Huun has implemented a total of 16 robots for the undergraduate nursing simulation programs at Indiana State School of Nursing. Here's the abstract:

Simulation has become commonplace yet must be expanded for distance/online nursing students. Evidence-based simulation entities (e-simulations, video simulation, and telepresence simulation) provide asynchronous and synchronous options. For quality assurance, the selected modality is best when aligned with Quality Matters (QM™) standards in the form of component design standards for ease of student and faculty use. A variety of simulation modalities are reviewed for component (simulation) design to provide high-quality simulation aligned with course design, delivery, and objectives for online/distance nursing students.

The article is published in the Volume 22, September 2018 of the Clinical Simulation in Nursing journal. Huun will be presenting at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare 2018 in Portugal this month.

You can read the full article at ScienceDirect: Virtual Simulations in Online Nursing Education: Align With Quality Matters


U.S. Attorney’s Office Reaches Agreement with Hudson Public Schools Regarding use of Classroom “Robot”

BOSTON – The U.S. Attorney’s Office entered into a Voluntary Compliance Agreement today with Hudson Public Schools regarding its obligations to ensure effective communication for students with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).   

The agreement addresses how the auxiliary aids and services provisions of the ADA can be used in a school to enable a student with a disability to use remote technology to effectively communicate with other students and teachers and to participate in classroom instruction and other school activities. Specifically, the student had requested to use a “robot” device capable of seeing, hearing and moving around the classroom under the student’s remote control, allowing the student to be able to communicate with teachers and students and participate in interactive classwork.

Continue reading at justice.gov


Maryland Department of Education Allocates $360,000 for Remote Classroom Technology

New Technology Grants Will Help School Systems Serve Vulnerable Student Population

‘Peyton’s Law’ Paves Way for Remote Classroom Technology Statewide

BALTIMORE—A new program will bring important educational technology to all 24 Maryland school systems.

The Hogan Administration has authorized the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) to process $15,000 technology grants for each local school system. The program, a product of Peyton’s Law, which was signed by Governor Larry Hogan in 2017, will provide funds to systems for the purchase of remote classroom technology. The devices will allow students unable to attend class for extended periods to remain connected to their educational programs.

The first student in Maryland to use remote classroom technology is believed to be Peyton Walton, a Montgomery County student who used a telepresence robot while she was receiving radiation therapy to treat a rare type of cancer. While the robot Peyton used was paid for by her classmates and community members, the new grant should allow each county to purchase four robots according to fiscal estimates.

Go to the Maryland Department of Education News Room


Double in Geisinger Health System

Geisinger Health System is partnering with Apple to introduce technology at each step of the patient's experience. In the video below, Double rolls in around 1:40 and highlights how they enable patients with chronic conditions to connect with the outside world.

To support the use of Doubles within the health system, Jeff Kay of CSIU and a physician at Geisinger collaborated on a research paper detailing how telepresence robots benefit hospital-bound children:

Mobile Robotic Telepresence Solutions for the Education of Hospitalized Children

About Geisinger: Geisinger is a physician-led healthcare system headquartered in Danville, PA. Their team of 30,000 employees across 13 hospital campuses serves a network of 583,000 plan members in the Eastern Pennsylvania/New Jersey area.


Introducing Fleet Management

Essential tools for telepresence admins.

Scheduling, Security, and Reporting.

We are happy to announce that Fleet Management is now available for all customers to try free for 14 days! These tools have been in beta testing for a while now and they have become essential to rolling out and managing fleets of 2 or more robots.

Fleet Management delivers on the most requested features from customers over the past year. Robot admins are absolutely loving it – and now is your chance to try it too!

Robot Reservations

Now you can share your robots with people throughout your organization and issue Visitor Passes to temporary drivers from one central dashboard on the web. Learn More

User Access Control

Remotely manage access to each robot on a per-user basis. You can easily onboard new users with mass email invitations, magic email domain (everyone @yourcompany.com), and Single Sign-On (SSO). Learn More

Call Log Reporting

Ensure that audit and compliance requirements are met with the use of the Call Log reporting feature. Learn More

Try Fleet Management Now


Double Robotics featured on the latest episode of Angie Tribeca!

Double Robotics was featured on the latest episode of Angie Tribeca on TBS Network! In this episode, titled "Turn Me On, Geils," a roboticist is found dead and Angie Tribeca and her partner Jay Geils question the only person who has any insight -- the roboticist's assistant, Vanessa -- who takes a liking to Geils. Check out the episode (Season 3, Episode 4) on Amazon Video or Hulu!

Study Shows Using Telepresence Robots is as Effective as Being There

A new study from University of Zurich and University of Leipzig found that utilizing mobile remote presence technologies (MRP) amongst a distributed team creates the same effect as working with team members in-person. The study, led by Dr. Erik Wende of University of Zurich, involved monitoring the mobile remote presence system for a distributed team based in Germany over a 12-month period. They concluded that, after an adjustment period, the local and remote team members worked as if they were together in-person.  

“As Lee et al. (2011) found, the MRP system enabled a broad range of meeting types and supported encounters that otherwise would not have happened [6]. The effect of physical embodiment increased feelings of social presence—contrary to the prior skepticism of users [6, 9]. After an initial adjustment period, users were able to interact almost as if they were located together, with no significant downsides. The MRP system was found to support teamwork and collaboration similar to that of a co-located team.”

"Most significantly, we identified that the level of social interaction supported by an MRP is heavily influenced by the usage arrangements. This is particularly in terms of meeting location and scheduling. The practical measures proposed in this research offer strategies for implementing MRP to overcome the issue of conversations in virtual teams being overly task-focused, to the detriment of relational links between team members [40]."

Study courtesy of Dr. Erik Wende, University of Zurich, and Prof. Rainer Alt, University of Leipzig

Guest Post: A Telepresence Robot that Augments Human Abilities

Toppan, a Japan-based global printing company, and Rekimoto Lab of the University of Tokyo recently introduced their research collaboration on IoA, the Internet of Abilities. IoA is a concept proposed by Professor Jun Rekimoto which focuses on augmenting human abilities beyond the constraints of time and space. Initial experiments on remote telepresence featured Double Robotics' 360 Camera Dolly. The team successfully captured immersive 360 video and projected it onto a remote dome, Jackin Stadium, for sharing the experience with multiple persons. 

Guest post & video courtesy of Toppan and Rekimoto Lab of the University of Tokyo